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Posts Tagged ‘depression’

A Star Appearance………….

Monday, March 17th, 2014

Cumbrian Red Squirrel

Cumbrian Red Squirrel

I thought that you might be a wee bit bored – for a while  – of my Top Banana Tips to bring Permanent Resolution to the wearisome –   debilitating ‘Ground Hog Day’ of mind-emotional problems.
SO: Here is a link for you to my Promo  – It lasts three minutes –  that’s all! Take a look – Enjoy – the Realization of the depths of the true Redemptive Wisdom of the Unconscious mind – to Resolve our       Mind-Emotional Problems.OR – sit back for three minutes and gawp happily at the Beauty of Derwentwater – and the River Greta ‘playing her merry songs’! plus  ‘the star’ appearance of the Red Squirrel!              There’s a mighty lot to enjoy in 3 minutes. Check it out please.
I am totally filled with Respect & Gratitude to all my Clients who gave their time & effort to make my Promo.
Work with me is Private – so their willingness & even eagerness to appear – for the Purpose of helping others with problems is nothing short of Awesome.
The Work and the Strategies I did 1:1 with these wonderful people –  I have Carefully & Rigorously distilled into my RAPHA HYPNOSIS –   half an hour a day – for forty days – in the privacy of one’s own home –   Therapeutic System.
It’s taken me many years to ‘get it Right’ AND produce my Courses! So, I’m pretty proud of me!So  please ‘Click’ the link above and meet a few ex clients:
SARAH –  an inability to commit to a relationship.
LYN –       anxiety & difficulty sleeping / insomnia
TALI –     debilitating stammering.
ELAINE –  social phobia & weight problems.
SUE –       in her words: “The old spider phobia”
JONNY –  Testicular Cancer – as Jonny says: “Low in       energy, low in self esteem, fearful, low in everything really. I left the first Session to be honest feeling like I was Rocky. Energy just seemed       to come  to me from nowhere”
CLAIRE –  Hay Fever
CASSIE –  Hay Fever

.And the RED SQUIRREL – came to make a Star Appearance…………………
ENJOY…….
Warmly
Sally         Sally Stubbs            Rapha Hypnosis Therapy System – ‘Cures that Endure’

 

My personal and private e mail: sally@sally-stubbs.com

DEPRESSION – AN INADEQUATE NAME…….?

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

Catbells in FebruaryI woke up today – bright and cheerful – but also sad for those of us who are not consistently cheerful and optimistic: which ‘believe it or not’ is our natural state to be in.

So I thought that the ‘black dog’ is a worthy subject for us to consider…….

Depression: a term coined by Adolf Meyer, has been considered an inadequate name.  William Styron in his account of his depression: Darkness Visible: wrote: ‘Melancholia’  would still be far more apt and evocative a word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a bland formality lacking any magisterial presence.

American author Susan Sontag was more succinct: “Depression is melancholy minus its charms…” Churchill named his own depression – ‘black dog’. He was not the first or last to use ‘black dog’ to describe depression. While the term has survived Churchill, its origins remain obscured in the history of the English language.  Churchill’s daughter, Lady Soames, said of her father’s depression: “A lot has been made of the depressive side of his character by psychiatrists who were never in the same room with him. He himself talks of his ‘black dog’, and he did have times of great depression, but marriage to my mother very largely kennelled the ‘black dog’.” Whatever our personal opinion may be on Churchill’s achievements, he certainly did achieve, even though chronically haunted by his ‘black dog’. I say: “We need to celebrate how well those of us suffering depression do function, and do achieve.”

I have worked as a clinical hypnotherapist and licensed psychotherapist for many years with young people suffering with depression. I have total respect for their inner strengths to cope. The psychological and emotional ‘worlds’ of depression which they have, not out of any conscious choice, entered, do not relate in anyway to the ‘worlds’ of day to day life. And so it takes massive energy for the sufferer to even attempt to relate to life.  Depression is often compounded with anxiety, such as shame, fear of the weakness to be able to change; (“Pull your self up with your boot laces!” Which actually defies physics, we can’t!) Guilt about having ‘mental illness’ and maybe guilt about how the illness affects others; family and friends.  We know the unbearable tragic statistics: around one million people in the world commit suicide each year; one in five of us, say the World Health Organisation, will suffer a ‘’mental illness’. Medication helps temporarily; it helps to get a flow of energy, specifically serotonin. But, it does not cure. For thirty years my focus has been on cure rather than management or control.  As Churchill’s daughter said; “… marriage to my mother very largely kennelled the black dog”.

However, I see that the ‘black dog’ is still looming, a dark presence in the back yard kennel, sadly ever ready to pounce!

How can we bring a cure?  As I truly do not want to lose you here, I repeat, I have total respect for the suffering of depression. I too suffered, in the early 1980’s; my life was not worth living.  I had a brilliant Therapist, David Grove!  I’ve had no recurrence of ‘depression’, the ‘black dog’ was set free, but that’s a whole story in itself, as the ‘black dog’ is a wounded part of our ‘Me’. Sure, I have had challenges, and sadness and loss, and I’ve discovered solutions to challenges and moved on, and I’ve grieved and moved on from my loss.

The next part of my discussion with you is largely based on my successful Work as a therapist plus my experience and rigourous study:  Anxiety and depression can become compounded into an undifferentiated mass of psychological and emotional information, leading us to experience the unsolvable horrific cycle of: “The same damned thing over and over again….” My Work differentiates out the anxiety, and brings resolution to the fears and shame; we can then give full attention to the depression. Depression will have its antecedents in our early formative years, in our learnt beliefs, trauma or crisis. We may or may not know what triggers the depression later, in our teens or young adult life. It’s not always necessary to know or have the insights about what triggered it.  In our early years we unconsciously, as a psychological protective mechanism, freeze moments in time. The unconscious stops time, right on the edge of trauma or crisis in an attempt to stop the next moments becoming worse: For example: I am age 5, this important adult is yelling at me….I unconsciously stop time whilst they are yelling at me in case they start beating me…… These ‘frozen moments’ of ‘the yelling’ play on and on deep within our mind for a year or twenty years until something in our environment triggers the feelings of fear, sadness, helplessness, not necessarily the memories of, in this example, a yelling adult.  We may not even have noticed the trigger, for example: The newspaper seller shouting the news on the street had the same tone and delivery of voice as the yelling adult….. We walked on by and suddenly we felt low or fearful.  These trigger encounters will connect deeply and significantly with our younger experience. Because, the part of us frozen in time never grew on in time and deeply continues to feel the ‘pain’ of those moments.  My work safely enters these frozen moments in time and brings resolution to the experiences, freeing the part of us who became ‘stuck’ enabling time to move on.

More about black dog depression and support at www.blackdogtribe.com

Thank you for listening.

Warmly  Sally

sally@sally-stubbs.com

www.sally-stubbs.com

GET OFF THE FENCE!

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

 

Sally Stubbs

Sally Stubbs

No More Pussy Footing Around

Hello

Great, we’re ‘getting off the fence’ as regards suffering! Real horrific suffering.
Pain, can also be the distress and anguish of our ‘collective unconscious’
Dr. John Sarno calls it ‘The Epidemic of Mind Body Disorders.’
This is a story about Debbie (not her real name).
I’m off the ‘fence’ and ‘shooting from the hip here’!
Debbie is 28 years old; she was diagnosed ten years ago with depression and prescribed anti depressants.
Three of her friends have been clients of mine, and all three have been urging Debbie to come and see me, which she did.
I have total respect for Debbie, in that she had to make a journey of over two hours driving to get to Keswick. Getting out of bed in the morning is an absolute ‘nightmare’ because her body, she said ‘weighs a ton’. She does not want to wake up.
Debbie’s pretty face and eyes are like a solid, frozen ‘mask’
Debbie had already told me on the phone that she had completely lost her “me”, and she constantly feels totally numb.
In my ‘world’ Debbie’s problem is not depression. Her problem is clearly that she lost her “me”, which is more than likely the cause of her feeling constantly totally numb.
Because of the mammoth effort she made to get to Keswick I said I wanted to ‘shoot from the hip’ Debbie nodded her head in agreement.
So I asked what happened about ten years ago.
“My Mum died” said Debbie, telling that she was very, very close to her Mum.
Still ‘shooting from the hip’ (I would normally go around the edges of a problem state, and never ask for a memory) I asked: “What is your last memory of your Mum?”
Debbie: “I am sitting beside my Mum, she is lying in the bed and she is dying.”
Believe me, I personally totally understand such great, great loss. And it is absolutely necessary for us to grieve for the sake of our heart and mind.
But the loss of “me” and chronic numbness is not a part of grief.
Debbie is in a “T Minus One” This is the moment that Debbie ‘Froze’ in an unsuccessful attempt to stop the next moment – of her Dear Mum’s death.
This is the moment that Debbie lost her “me” and went into feeling numb.
Simplistically Debbie’s “me” is still, as her memory tells us, sitting by her dying Mum’s bed………
Our Work together for me and Debbie, would be to very carefully assist her “me” to ‘leave’ that chair where her “me” is still sitting………
And she could have done this with one of my audio courses/treatments. But she now needs a bit of me as she believes that her numbness has, over the years, become too dense for her self to make the effort.
I believe that Debbie’s story will make sense to you.
I believe her story will somehow help you.
So, here’s my ‘shoot from the hip’ thought: Wouldn’t it be perfect if our well meaning well intentioned doctors would say, instead of: “You’re depressed, here is your medication.”
“You are in “T Minus One” I’ll phone a therapist for you who Works this way…..”
Ten years of such suffering for Debbie, and others, it’s heart wrenching………..please visit
www.rapha-hypnosis.com you will be warmly welcomed.
Thinking of you Warmly
Sally

https://www.sally-stubbs.com/

My personal and private e mail: sally@sally-stubbs.com please feel free to contact me:

TALKING ABOUT BLACK DOG?

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

So, I woke up today – bright and cheerful – and also sad for those of us who are not consistently cheerful and optimistic, which ‘believe it or not’ is our natural state to be in.
So I thought that the ‘black dog’ is a worthy subject for us to consider…….
Depression, a term coined by Adolf Meyer, has been considered an inadequate name.
William Styron in his account of his depression, Darkness Visible, wrote: “’Melancholia’ would still be far more apt and evocative a word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a bland formality lacking any magisterial presence.”
American author Susan Sontag was more succinct: “Depression is melancholy minus its charms…”
Churchill named his own depression – ‘black dog’. He was not the first or last to use ‘black dog’ to describe depression. While the term has survived Churchill, its origins remain obscured in the history of the English language.
Churchill’s daughter, Lady Soames, said of her father’s depression:
“A lot has been made of the depressive side of his character by psychiatrists who were never in the same room with him. He himself talks of his ‘black dog’, and he did have times of great depression, but marriage to my mother very largely kennelled the ‘black dog’.”
Whatever our personal opinion may be on Churchill’s achievements, he certainly did achieve, even though chronically haunted by his ‘black dog’.
I say: “We need to celebrate how well those of us suffering depression do function, and do achieve.”
I have worked as a clinical hypnotherapist and licensed psychotherapist for many years with young people suffering with depression. I have total respect for their inner strengths to cope. The psychological and emotional ‘worlds’ of depression which they have, not out of any conscious choice, entered, do not relate in anyway to the ‘worlds’ of day to day life. And so it takes massive energy for the sufferer to even attempt to relate to life.
Depression is often compounded with anxiety, such as shame, fear of the weakness to be able to change; (“Pull your self up with your boot laces!” Which actually defies physics, we can’t!) Guilt about having ‘mental illness’ and maybe guilt about how the illness affects others; family and friends.
We know the unbearable tragic statistics: around one million people in the world commit suicide each year; one in five of us, say the World Health Organisation, will suffer a ‘’mental illness’.
Medication helps temporarily; it helps to get a flow of energy, specifically serotonin. But, it does not cure. For thirty years my focus has been on cure rather than management or control.
As Churchill’s daughter said; “… marriage to my mother very largely kennelled the black dog”.
However, I see that the ‘black dog’ is still looming, a dark presence in the back yard kennel, sadly ever ready to pounce!
How can we bring a cure?
As I truly do not want to lose you here, I repeat, I have total respect for the suffering of depression. I too suffered, in the early 1980’s; my life was not worth living.
I had a brilliant Therapist, David Grove!
I’ve had no recurrence of ‘depression’, the ‘black dog’ was set free, but that’s a whole story in itself, as the ‘black dog’ is a wounded part of our ‘Me’.
Sure, I have had challenges, and sadness and loss, and I’ve discovered solutions to challenges and moved on, and I’ve grieved and moved on from my loss.
The next part of my discussion with you is largely based on my successful Work as a therapist plus my experience and rigourous study:
Anxiety and depression can become compounded into an undifferentiated mass of psychological and emotional information, leading us to experience the unsolvable horrific cycle of: “The same damned thing over and over again….”
My Work differentiates out the anxiety, and brings resolution to the fears and shame; we can then give full attention to the depression.
Depression will have its antecedents in our early formative years, in our learnt beliefs, trauma or crisis. We may or may not know what triggers the depression later, in our teens or young adult life. It’s not always necessary to know or have the insights about what triggered it.
In our early years we unconsciously, as a psychological protective mechanism, freeze moments in time. The unconscious stops time, right on the edge of trauma or crisis in an attempt to stop the next moments becoming worse: For example: I am age 5, this important adult is yelling at me….I unconsciously stop time whilst they are yelling at me in case they start beating me……
These ‘frozen moments’ of ‘the yelling’ play on and on deep within our mind for a year or twenty years until something in our environment triggers the feelings of fear, sadness, helplessness, not necessarily the memories of, in this example, a yelling adult.
We may not even have noticed the trigger, for example: The newspaper seller shouting the news on the street had the same tone and delivery of voice as the yelling adult…..
We walked on by and suddenly we felt low or fearful.
These trigger encounters will connect deeply and significantly with our younger experience. Because, the part of us frozen in time never grew on in time and deeply continues to feel the ‘pain’ of those moments.
My work safely enters these frozen moments in time and brings resolution to the experiences, freeing the part of us who became ‘stuck’ enabling time to move on.
More about black dog depression and support at Blackdog Tribe.com
Thank you for listening.
Sally

www.sally-stubbs.com